Fungi in the Intestines Can Make Alcohol Side Effects Even Worse

Fungal infections and alcohol

If you ask anyone who’s suffered from Candida what happened when they drank alcohol, they will tell you that the hangovers are insufferable. Fungal infections and alcohol don’t mix very well.

What is the Connection between Fungal Infections and Alcohol?

People suffering from a fungal infection like Candida albicans are advised not to drink alcohol. For starters, many alcoholic products like wine contain lots of sugar along with yeast. If someone is already suffering from yeast-overgrowth, drinking alcohol only compounds the issues. In fact, alcohol will feed the yeast overgrowth.

Candida and alcohol have another common denominator: acetaldehyde. When you drink alcohol, the liver breaks it down and turns it into acetaldehyde. One of the things Candida produces in the body is also acetaldehyde.

The problem arises when there is so much acetaldehyde in the body that it can no longer produce enough enzymes to break that acetaldehyde down and turn it into acetate. In a sense, the body is then poisoned by acetaldehyde. As a result, people feel nauseous and dizzy, along with all the other common side effects of alcohol.

What Happens When Fungal Infections and Alcohol Meet in the Intestines?

If Candida is left untreated, it can break down the walls of the intestines and seep into the bloodstream. This can have lethal consequences. Alcohol can also attack the lining of the intestines.

So, when fungi are present in the intestines, and the person drinks alcohol, the lining of the intestines suffers a double onslaught. In addition, some of the alcohol is broken down into acetaldehyde in the intestines, further stressing the lining.

Final Thoughts

Alcohol should be a definite no-no for anyone suffering from a fungal infection. Fungal infections and alcohol can be a deadly combination, with the side effects of alcohol increased to an unbearable and dangerous level.