Yeast Infections: Eat This, Not That

Here’s a surprising statistic: 3 out of 4 women will experience a yeast infection at least once, reports the National Women’s Health Resource Center.

Symptoms can include a burning sensation, itch or soreness, and a yeast-scented discharge.

Diet plays a big role in both reducing your risks of experiencing a yeast infection, and managing the symptoms and speeding up recovery if you currently have a yeast infection.

If you want to influence your yeast levels through the foods you eat, there are certain foods you want to eat more of, and certain foods that you’ll want to cut out or minimize.

Avoid These Foods

“Some studies suggest that reducing sugar in the diet may help prevent yeast infections,” reports the University of Maryland Medical Center.

The average American eats 152 pounds of sugar every year, which equals approximately 3 pounds of sugar a week. This may be contributing to rising rates of yeast infections and other health problems! Common sneaky sources of sugar include breakfast cereal, sauces and condiments like barbecue sauce and ketchup, and junk food that masquerades as health food (e.g. dehydrated fruit with added sugar).

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, other foods you’ll want to avoid include dairy, as well as foods made with yeast: Cheese, alcohol and some forms of nuts.

Eat More of These Foods

Take a regular probiotic supplement, or eat fermented foods that are high in beneficial bacteria such as kimchi and yogurt. Adding more beneficial bacteria to your diet can boost your gut health, and the bacteria can compete with the yeast and minimize yeast growth.

Fatty fish and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids, such as walnuts and flax, help reduce inflammation and can lower the pain and swelling you might feel when having a yeast infection.

Finally, eat foods that naturally help fight fungus. This includes citrus foods, and coriander (coriander essential oils have been shown to help kill fungus).